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npic.orst.edu/ingred/ptype/mothball/regulation.html

Mothballs - Regulation, Proper Uses and Alternatives Regulation of Mothballs. Mothballs are pesticides intended to kill clothes moths and other fabric pests. They are regulated in the United States by the Environmental Protection Agency.The label of any pesticide, including mothballs, specifies exactly where and how you can legally use the product. Using mothballs in a way not specified by the ...

blogs.webmd.com/from-our-archives/20110222/are-mothballs-safe

Are Mothballs Safe? By Janelle Sorensen February 22, 2011. From the WebMD Archives. A Baby’s Death Prompts a Call for a Ban. A few weeks ago, pediatricians in Australia called for a ban on a common ingredient in mothballs after it was linked to one baby’s death and brain damage in two others. The primary ingredient of concern is naphthalene ...

www.wikihow.com/Use-Mothballs

To use mothballs, start by packing the clothes that you want to protect into an airtight container. Then, lay mothballs around the clothes in the container, using the right number of mothballs according to the instructions on the package. Next, seal the container and store it in a closet or under your bed.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mothball

Use as a rodent, squirrel, and bat repellent is also largely ineffective, is illegal in many areas, and tends to cause more annoyance to humans than to the target pest. Mothballs, however, continue to be advertised as squirrel repellent and are an ingredient in some commercial vermin and snake repellent products.

articles.mercola.com/.../archive/2017/10/18/safe-alternatives-toxic-mothballs.aspx

Mothballs contain toxic chemicals, namely naphthalene and paradichlorobenzene, which are unsafe for people, pets and wildlife; Several safe alternatives exist to the use of mothballs, including cedar blocks or chips and essential oils such as lavender, mint and white camphor

emagazine.com/are-mothballs-safe

Dear EarthTalk: Are mothballs safe to use? If not, are there any environmentally friendly alternatives? —Anna Wiener, Dearborn, Michigan. Even though they are not as popular as they once were, mothballs are still used by many people to keep stored clothes, furniture and carpets free of hungry pests like moths.

www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/mothballs-in-gardens.htm

Mothballs are labeled only for use in closed containers for the control of clothes moths. Alternatives to Mothballs. There are a number of ways to eliminate animal pests from the garden without using mothballs. Hazards are minimal when you avoid using chemicals and poisons. Here are some tips on using safe control measures as alternatives to ...

www.ecofriendlylink.com/blog/mothballsandsafealternatives

It’s extremely effective, but not safe for us. A baby died in Australia in 2011 after being wrapped in a blanket which had been stored in mothballs. Even if you use mothballs according to the directions, I believe it’s safer and better to use non-chemical alternatives. Pre-Wash

www.bhg.com/gardening/pests/animal/can-i-use-mothballs-to-keep-rabbits-out-of...

Can I use mothballs to keep rabbits out of my garden? Many gardeners seem to think that moth crystals or mothballs must be a "safe" rabbit repellent to use in the garden because they can use the product in their home.

www.organicconsumers.org/news/safe-alternatives-toxic-mothballs

In earlier times, mothballs were commonly added to storage bins, boxes and trunks to prevent clothing made from natural fibers from becoming infested with moth larvae. Mothballs contain toxic chemicals, namely naphthalene and paradichlorobenzene, which are unsafe for people, pets and wildlife. Several safe alternatives exist to the use of mothballs, including cedar blocks or