Ladybugs, also known as ladybirds or lady beetles, are generally harmless to humans and pets. While they do produce toxic chemicals, the primary effect of the chemicals is to make the beetles smell and taste bad to preda... More »

Some treatments for ladybug infestations include placing cloves on window sills, burning lemon-scented candles in areas where the infestations occur and placing double-sided tape or sticky strips along baseboards and oth... More »

www.reference.com Home & Garden Pest Control Invasive Insects

Some treatments for ladybug infestations include placing cloves on window sills, burning lemon-scented candles in areas where the infestations occur and placing double-sided tape or sticky strips along baseboards and oth... More »

www.reference.com Home & Garden Pest Control

Ladybugs, also known as ladybirds or lady beetles, are considered to be a sign of good luck in a number of cultures. In Sweden, a ladybug landing in a young girl's hand is a sign that she will marry soon. English farmers... More »

Ladybugs need air, like humans, but unlike humans they do not have lungs. Instead, they take in air through tiny openings in the sides of their abdomen and thorax called spiracles. The distribution of oxygen in ladybugs'... More »

Orange ladybugs are not poisonous and do not pose a threat to humans. Likewise, ladybugs of other colors, including the well-known black and red species, are not poisonous. More »

According to Encyclopædia Britannica, praying mantises feed exclusively on insects, and they are harmless to humans. No known venomous species of mantis exists. Although their appearance may be frightening, mantises are ... More »