Web Results

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archeopteryx

Archaeopteryx continues to play an important part in scientific debates about the origin and evolution of birds. Some scientists see it as a semi-arboreal climbing animal, following the idea that birds evolved from tree-dwelling gliders (the "trees down" hypothesis for the evolution of flight proposed by O. C. Marsh ).

www.nationalgeographic.com/science/phenomena/2013/07/31/...

But it’s less clear now how exactly Archaeopteryx fits into that evolution. It might still be closely related to the ancestors of living birds, or there might be non-flying theropods that were ...

creation.com/Archaeopteryx

Archaeopteryx by Dr Carl Wieland Please note: More recent articles on Archaeopteryx are available on this Web site. See, for example, ‘Bird Evolution flies out the window’ Creation scientists and speakers have a wealth of documentation to support the...

www.icr.org/article/does-archaeopteryx-show-bird-evolution

Archaeopteryx is a big word that simply means “ancient wing.” It refers to a set of fossils of a strange-looking extinct bird. Books promoting evolution often show pictures of Archaeopteryx.Its beak had small teeth, so many scientists see it as playing a lead role in an unthinkably long plot about reptiles evolving into birds.

www.livescience.com/24745-archaeopteryx.html

Archaeopteryx was an evolutionary link between dinosaurs and birds. Scientists long thought Archaeopteryx was the first bird, but recent discoveries have made them rethink that status.

evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/evograms_06

The origin of birds. The discovery that birds evolved from small carnivorous dinosaurs of the Late Jurassic was made possible by recently discovered fossils from China, South America, and other countries, as well as by looking at old museum specimens from new perspectives and with new methods. The hunt for the ancestors of living birds began with a specimen of Archaeopteryx, the first known ...

www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/birds/archaeopteryx.html

The origin of flight, and the actual flight capabilities of Archaeopteryx, are debated. Two models of the evolution of flight have been proposed: in the "trees-down" model, birds evolved from ancestors that lived in trees and could glide down, analogous to today's flying squirrels.

www.reptileevolution.com/archaeopteryx.htm

On the Archaeopteryx von Meyer, with a description of the fossil remains of a long-tailed species from the lithographic stone of Solnhofen. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, London 153: 33-47. Paul G 2002. Dinosaurs of the Air: The Evolution and Loss of Flight in Dinosaurs and Birds.

www.blogos.org/scienceandtechnology/archaeopteryx-evolution.php

After the initial discovery in the 1860s, scientists have determined that Archaeopteryx was not the actual ancestor of modern birds, but it is the earliest fossil to have certain traits found in modern birds. It is often heralded as "proof" of evolution, and as a clear example of a transitional form.

www.hmns.org/exhibits/past-exhibitions/archaeopteryx-icon-of-evolution

Archaeopteryx: Icon of Evolution was on display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science from April 23 through September 6, 2010. The exhibition was on display at the Houston Musuem of Natural Science in Sugar Land from November 22, 2010 through March 20, 2011. Most scientists believe that birds evolved from small therapod dinosaurs. The key step was the development of feathers, turning ...