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www.ancient.eu/article/483

Although ancient Greek Society was dominated by the male citizen, with his full legal status, right to vote, hold public office, and own property, the social groups which made up the population of a typical Greek city-state or polis were remarkably diverse. Women, children, immigrants (both Greek and foreign), labourers, and slaves all had defined roles, but there was interaction (often ...

study.com/academy/lesson/significance-of-citizenship-in-ancient-greece.html

Ancient Greek Citizenship. Citizenship is something you should really take seriously. Not to lecture you or anything, but it is a big deal. Being a citizen means legally belonging and having all ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_citizenship

In a book entitled Constitution of the Athenians, written in 350 BCE, the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle suggested that ancient Greeks thought that being a citizen was a natural state, according to J. G. A. Pocock. It was an elitist notion, according to Peter Riesenberg, ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_in_Greek_Antiquity

Ancient Greece (Greek: Ἑλλάς, romanized: Hellás) was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. AD 600). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages and the Byzantine era. Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse of Mycenaean Greece, Greek ...

ezinearticles.com/?Ancient-Greece-Citizens&id=948123

When we use the word "citizens" we are usually referring to a group of people who live in the same city, with a common origin, language, customs and laws. According to Plato, the ideal city should have no more than 5000 inhabitants, so that they would all know each other. But in 5th century Athens, things were somewhat different, with approximately 40,000 citizens, 20,000 metoici (reside...

erenow.net/ancient/ancient-greece-and-rome-an-encyclopedia-for-students-4...

While the Greeks tended to limit citizenship to children born to citizens, the Romans were more willing to extend citizenship to include others who had previously been excluded, such as freed slaves. Citizenship in Ancient Greece. In Greece, citizenship meant sharing in the duties and privileges of membership in the polis, or city-state*.

www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/democracy-ancient-greece

The ancient Greeks were the first to create a democracy.The word “democracy” comes from two Greek words that mean people (demos) and rule (kratos).Democracy is the idea that the citizens of a country should take an active role in the government of their country and manage it directly or through elected representatives.

www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/ancient-greece

Ancient Greece, the birthplace of democracy, was the source of some of the greatest literature, architecture, science and philosophy in Western civilization, and home to stunning historical sites ...

www.theweek.com/articles/703720/genius-way-ancient-greeks-taxed-citizens

The word liturgy — from the ancient Greek leitourgia — means "public service" or "work of the people." The idea of benefaction was embedded in the ancient Greek psyche, and had roots in mythology.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_ancient_Greece

Slavery was an accepted practice in ancient Greece, as in other societies of the time.Some Ancient Greek writers (including, most notably, Aristotle) described slavery as natural and even necessary.This paradigm was notably questioned in Socratic dialogues; the Stoics produced the first recorded condemnation of slavery.. The principal use of slaves was in agriculture, but they were also used ...