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www.ancient.eu/article/483

Although ancient Greek Society was dominated by the male citizen, with his full legal status, right to vote, hold public office, and own property, the social groups which made up the population of a typical Greek city-state or polis were remarkably diverse. Women, children, immigrants (both Greek and foreign), labourers, and slaves all had defined roles, but there was interaction (often ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_citizenship

History of citizenship describes the changing relation between an individual and the state, commonly known as citizenship.Citizenship is generally identified not as an aspect of Eastern civilization but of Western civilization. There is a general view that citizenship in ancient times was a simpler relation than modern forms of citizenship, although this view has been challenged.

erenow.net/ancient/ancient-greece-and-rome-an-encyclopedia-for-students-4...

Citizenship in Ancient Greece. In Greece, citizenship meant sharing in the duties and privileges of membership in the polis, or city-state*. Citizens were required to fight in defense of the polis and expected to participate in the political life of the city by voting. In return, they were the only ones allowed to own land and to hold political ...

study.com/academy/lesson/significance-of-citizenship-in-ancient-greece.html

Example: Ancient Greek citizens were male, not female. Essay Prompt 1: In an essay of at least 1–2 paragraphs, explain the role of geographical organization in defining ancient Greek citizenship.

ezinearticles.com/?Ancient-Greece-Citizens&id=948123

When we use the word "citizens" we are usually referring to a group of people who live in the same city, with a common origin, language, customs and laws. According to Plato, the ideal city should have no more than 5000 inhabitants, so that they would all know each other. But in 5th century Athens, things were somewhat different, with approximately 40,000 citizens, 20,000 metoici (reside...

www.history.com/topics/ancient-greece/ancient-greece-democracy

For example, in Athens in the middle of the 4th century there were about 100,000 citizens (Athenian citizenship was limited to men and women whose parents had also been Athenian citizens), about ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_civilization

Ancient Greece (Greek: Ἑλλάς, romanized: Hellás) was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. AD 600). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages and the Byzantine era. Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse of Mycenaean Greece, Greek ...

www.ancientgreece.co.uk/athens

Male citizens in Athens could vote on all the decisions that affected the city and serve on juries. However, democracy was not open to everyone. Citizen women and children were not allowed to vote. Slaves and foreigners living in Athens (known as metics) were banned from participating in government.

www.ancient.eu/greece

Greece is a country in southeastern Europe, known in Greek as Hellas or Ellada, and consisting of a mainland and an archipelago of islands.Ancient Greece is the birthplace of Western philosophy (Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle), literature (Homer and Hesiod), mathematics (Pythagoras and Euclid), history (), drama (Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes), the Olympic Games, and democracy.

www.answers.com/Q/What_were_the_requirements_of_the_citizenship_in_ancient_Greece

The requirements of the citizenship in ancient Greece was that men under the age of 18 would not be a citizen. In 451 B.C the rules of citizenship became stricter. Men could become citizens only ...