Dream catchers made by members of the Cherokee tribe feature an elaborate design of interlocking circles and are often as wide as 6 to 12 inches across. The hand-crafted pieces are frequently adorned with beads and feath... More »

The most common dream catcher legend tells of a grandmother who saved a spider's life. In exchange, the spider gave her a dream catcher, explaining that it allowed good dreams to slip through and caught bad dreams. There... More »

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At some point during the pan-Indian movement of the 1960s and 1970s, dream catchers became a popularly made item among many Native American tribes, including the Cherokee, Navajo and Lakota. They are not, however, tradit... More »

Some Cherokee Indian tribal symbols include the numbers four and seven, circles, the owl, the cougar, and trees such as the holly, spruce, laurel and cedar. The cedar tree is particularly sacred to the Cherokee, and its ... More »

At some point during the pan-Indian movement of the 1960s and 1970s, dream catchers became a popularly made item among many Native American tribes, including the Cherokee, Navajo and Lakota. They are not, however, tradit... More »

Facts about the Cherokee tribe for kids include that most Cherokee sided with the Confederacy during the Civil War, Cherokee men usually only wore a deerskin loincloth and moccasins in warm weather, and the Cherokee were... More »

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The most common dream catcher legend tells of a grandmother who saved a spider's life. In exchange, the spider gave her a dream catcher, explaining that it allowed good dreams to slip through and caught bad dreams. There... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Folklore