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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziggurat_of_Ur

The Ziggurat (or Great Ziggurat) of Ur (Sumerian: 𒂍𒋼𒅎𒅍 é-temen-ní-gùru "Etemenniguru", meaning "temple whose foundation creates aura") is a Neo-Sumerian ziggurat in what was the city of Ur near Nasiriyah, in present-day Dhi Qar Province, Iraq.

www.khanacademy.org/.../sumerian/a/ziggurat-of-ur

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www.ancient-origins.net/.../great-ziggurat-ur-001767

The Great Ziggurat of Ur was dedicated to the moon god Nanna, who was the patron deity of the city. As the Mesopotamian gods were commonly linked to the eastern mountains, the ziggurat may have functioned as a representation of their homes.

smarthistory.org/ziggurat-of-ur

Ziggurat of Ur, c. 2100 B.C.E. mud brick and baked brick, Tell el-Mukayyar, Iraq (largely reconstructed) The Great Ziggurat The ziggurat is the most distinctive architectural invention of the Ancient Near East.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziggurat

Ziggurat designs ranged from simple bases upon which a temple sat, to marvels of mathematics and construction which spanned several terraced stories and were topped with a temple. An example of a simple ziggurat is the White Temple of Uruk, in ancient Sumer. The ziggurat itself is the base on which the White Temple is set.

www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g659534-d4588679...

The ziggurat at Ur dominates the desert in this southern area of southern Iraq, standing near the nearby town of An-Nasiriyah. Historically & culturally interesting to visit if in the area. Date of experience: November 2016

www.britannica.com/technology/ziggurat

The best-preserved ziggurat is at Ur (modern Tall al-Muqayyar, Iraq). The largest, at Choghā Zanbīl in Elam (now in southwestern Iran), is 335 feet (102 metres) square and 80 feet (24 metres) high and stands at less than half its estimated original height.

courses.lumenlearning.com/.../chapter/ziggurat-of-ur

Ziggurat of Ur, c. 2100 BCE mud brick and baked brick, Tell el-Mukayyar, Iraq (largely reconstructed) The ziggurat is the most distinctive architectural invention of the Ancient Near East. Like an ancient Egyptian pyramid, an ancient Near Eastern ziggurat has four sides and rises up to the realm of the gods.

www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-places-asia/ziggurat...

Another well preserved ziggurat is the Great Ziggurat of Ur in Iraq. The significance of this ancient ziggurat may be seen even in modern times. In 1985, Saddam Hussein had the ziggurat rebuilt, and the bricks used for this project had his name stamped on them, in imitation of Nebuchadnezzar.

www.ancient.eu/image/197

The ziggurat was a piece in a temple complex that served as an administrative center for the city, and which was a shrine of the moon god Nanna, the patron deity of Ur. The construction of the ziggurat was finished in the 21st century BCE by King Shulgi, who, in order to win the allegiance of cities , proclaimed himself a god.