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Yellow jackets and hornets differ in where they build their nests and how they eat. Yellow jackets build nests in soil, while hornets build their nests in trees. Yellow jackets are scavengers, eating dead insects and sug... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects

While they are similar to other insects in some ways, you can identify a yellow jacket using the insect's size, color and behavior. Yellow jackets are small insects, typically under an inch long. The name derives from th... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects

You can identify wasps and hornets by examining the insect's size, markings and colors. Other clues to help differentiate wasps from hornets include the insects' nesting behaviors, living situations and temperaments. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects
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Identify hornets through coloration, size and types of nests. Common types of hornets include baldfaced, European and mud daubers. Baldfaced hornets are predominantly black in color with a white face. They build paper ne... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects

The main difference between wasps and hornets is that wasp colonies tend to be smaller, with fewer than 100 individuals, while hornet colonies typically have many more. It is often difficult to tell the difference betwee... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects

A variety of animals, including frogs, lizards, birds and bats, eat adult wasps or hornets. Mice, rats, weasels, badgers and raccoons also eat wasp larvae. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects

Although most wasps don't typically fly at night, hornets, which are a type of wasp, do. The European hornet, the only species of hornet found in the U.S., flies at night in calm muggy weather. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects