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www.reference.com/history/native-american-tribes-made...

The Native American tribes known to have originally created dreamcatchers were the Annishnabe, Chippewa and the Ojibwe, sometimes spelled "Ojibway" or "Ojibwa." The use of dreamcatchers later spread among the Cree, Crow, Cochiti, Laguna and Zuni Indian nations.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamcatcher_(Native_American)

While Dreamcatchers continue to be used in a traditional manner in their communities and cultures of origin, a derivative form of "dreamcatchers" were also adopted into the Pan-Indian Movement of the 1960s and 1970s as a symbol of unity among the various Native American cultures, or a general symbol of identification with Native American or First Nations cultures.

www.native-languages.org/dreamcatchers.htm

Traditionally Native American dreamcatchers are small (only a few inches across) and made of bent wood and sinew string with a feather hanging from the netting, but wrapping the frame in leather is also pretty common, and today you'll often see dreamcatchers made with sturdier string meant to last longer and decorated with beaded thongs.

owlcation.com/humanities/History-and-Tradition-of-the...

In time, as other Native American tribes adopted the tradition of dream catchers, the legends and stories behind their origin would vary. In the Ojibwe legends, the dream catchers served to catch any negative energies that were in the room and the dreams of those who slept there would be good ones.

www.quora.com/What-Native-American-culture-invented-dream...

The use of dream catchers soon spread to neighboring tribes through intermarriage and trade. Then during the Pan Indian Movement in the 60s and 70s, other disparate Native American tribes such as the Cherokee, Lakota, and Navajo tribes also began using dream catchers.

dreamcatcher.com/dreamcatchers

Dream Catchers are a spiritual tool used to help assure good dreams to those that sleep under them. A dream catcher is usually placed over a place you would sleep where the morning light can hit it. As you sleep all dreams from the spirit world have to pass through the dream catcher.

alltribes.com/southwest-decor/native-crafts/dreamcatchers

In addition to Native American jewelry, Alltribes upholds the ancient traditions of Native Americans by offering more than remarkable jewelry. You can also own Hopi Kachina dolls, pueblo pottery, hand-dyed leather belts, dreamcatchers, tomahawks and other Southwestern and Native American artifacts, to beautify your home and your life.

www.nativeamericanvault.com/collections/dreamcatchers

Dream catchers are one of the most fascinating traditions of Native Americans. The traditional dream catcher was intended to protect the sleeping individual from negative dreams, while letting positive dreams through. Here at Native American Vault, we offer wonderfully made dreamcatchers with varying designs and sizes.

www.dream-catchers.org

Dream catchers are one of the most fascinating traditions of Native Americans. The traditional dream catcher was intended to protect the sleeping individual from negative dreams, while letting positive dreams through.The positive dreams would slip through the hole in the center of the dream catcher, and glide down the feathers to the sleeping person below.

feltmagnet.com/.../How-to-make-a-native-american-dreamcatcher

I have made many dreamcatchers and have studied the legends that surround them. There are probably as many styles and legends for dream catchers as there are native American tribes. I was told at a young age that my great grandmother was full blooded Choctaw. She had even lived on the Oklahoma reservation.