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study.com/academy/lesson/zero-exponent-rule-definition-examples.html

The zero exponent rule states that any term with an exponent of zero is equal to one. This lesson will go into the rule in more detail, explaining how it works and giving some examples.

www.reference.com/world-view/zero-exponent-6703549ee0bc27d0

Essentially, an exponent that is zero is equal to a variable to the power of an exponent times a variable to the negative power of the same exponent. For instance, x 2 times x-2 is equal to x 2 divided by x-2. Any number divided by itself is equal to one. Zero to the power of zero is a special case, however. Some mathematicians say that it ...

virtualnerd.com/.../negative-zero-exponents/zero-exponent-definition

What Do You Do With a Zero Exponent? Note: A lot of people get a little uneasy when they see 0, especially when that 0 is the exponent in some expression. After all, there seem to be so many rules about 0, and so many special cases where you're not allowed to do something. Well it turns out that a zero in the exponent is one of the best things ...

www.homeschoolmath.net/teaching/negative_zero_exponents.php

Worksheets for negative and zero exponents Create free worksheets in PDF or html format for practicing zero and negative exponents. The worksheets can be customized in several ways. Are Negative Exponents Like Other Exponents? Is there a general rule for doing all exponents, or does a negative exponent have nothing in common with positive ...

www.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_definition_of_a_zero_exponent

The zero exponent rule basically says that any base with an exponent of zero is equal to one. For example: x^0 = 1 A negative exponent is equivalent to 1 over a positive exponent. x^1 = x x^0 = 1 ...

www.answers.com/Q/What_is_zero_exponent

The zero exponent rule basically says that any base with an exponent of zero is equal to one. For example: x^0 = 1 A negative exponent is equivalent to 1 over a positive exponent. x^1 = x x^0 = 1 ...

www.khanacademy.org/.../pre-algebra-exponents/v/powers-of-zero

Even negative or fractional exponents, which we haven't talked about yet, as long as they're non-zero, this is just going to be equal to 0, kind of makes sense. But now, let's think about what 0 to the 0-th power is, because this is actually a fairly deep question.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_to_the_power_of_zero

Zero to the power of zero, denoted by 0 0, is a mathematical expression with no agreed-upon value.The most common possibilities are 1 or leaving the expression undefined, with justifications existing for each, depending on context. In algebra, combinatorics, or set theory, the generally agreed upon value is 0 0 = 1, whereas in mathematical analysis, the expression is sometimes left undefined.

medium.com/i-math/the-zero-power-rule-explained-449b4bd6934d

The “ Zero Power Rule” Explained. Brett Berry. Follow. Feb 19, 2016 · 5 min read. Exponents seem pretty straightforward, right? Raise a number to the power of 1 means you have one of that ...

www.khanacademy.org/math/pre-algebra/pre-algebra-exponents-radicals/pre...

Discover a pattern that explains why any non-zero number to the zero power equals one. If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.