ARTICLES

The diet of Neanderthals consisted primarily of meat, based on several pieces of evidence. There is some evidence, however, that shows Neanderthals may also have consumed plant-based food as well.

www.reference.com/article/did-neanderthals-eat-e8ac51198bf91f3f

The earliest humans ate a diet similar to that of apes and chimpanzees, consisting mostly of fruit and leaves with occasional insects and meat. As humans developed tool use, meat became a much larger portion of the human...

www.reference.com/history/kinds-food-did-early-man-eat-602b1e319637ed44

Neanderthals in most ways resembled modern humans, but they lacked complete upright posture and had a shorter stature, a stockier build and greater strength. The cranium and face had significantly more robust features. T...

www.reference.com/article/did-neanderthals-look-like-f39cdf4c664cebf0

SIMILAR ARTICLES

People who lived during the Stone Age ate meat, vegetation and grains. Their diets are likely similar to the diets of many farmers who live in Asia, especially in India and China.

www.reference.com/history/did-stone-age-people-eat-530d499607e218cb

Cro-Magnon man, now referred to as European Early Modern Humans, were hunter-gatherers who ate a varied diet containing hunted big game, fruits, nuts, berries, seeds, plants and roots. It is also known that they ate fish...

www.reference.com/history/did-cro-magnons-hunt-eat-3ba70eda8c38b15f

The oldest evidence for a civilization, defined by urban development, social stratification, writing systems and agriculture, comes from the Mesopotamian region between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers of the Middle East....

www.reference.com/article/first-civilization-649248a4ae1898aa

Some of the earliest inventions of the Stone Age were simple hammerstones that showed evidence of battering, and stone cores, used for a variety of purposes, such as chopping. These stone cores could also produce sharp s...

www.reference.com/history/stone-age-inventions-ed46d34dc424004c