ARTICLES

The structure of an ammonia molecule consists of one nitrogen atom surrounded by three hydrogen atoms in a trigonal pyramidal molecular geometry. Ammonia is denoted as NH3 in formulas and is also referred to as ammonia g...

www.reference.com/article/structure-ammonia-molecule-25244c7a315abbc4

A water molecule measure approximately 2.75 angstroms, making it one of the smallest of all molecules. One meter is 10 billion angstroms. The water molecule is shaped like a V, with two atoms of hydrogen extending at an ...

www.reference.com/science/size-water-molecule-78a78df6fa7af22f

Water is a polar molecule because it possesses a negative point and a positive point in its structure as opposed to a consistent charge throughout. Some other examples of polar molecules are ammonia, sugars and hydrogen ...

www.reference.com/article/water-polar-molecule-9a120f1bd5a537da

SIMILAR ARTICLES

NH3, commonly known as ammonia, is arranged as a T-shaped molecule with nitrogen at its center and three hydrogen atoms at its extremities. Each hydrogen atom is covalently bonded to the nitrogen via an electron pair, an...

www.reference.com/article/lewis-dot-structure-nh3-2c2be75e6b5a805e

One of the most unique things about an organic molecule is that it is considered the molecule of life because it is formed by chains of carbon and hydrogen atoms. Carbon has the ability to bond with other atoms as well a...

www.reference.com/article/unique-organic-molecule-8f501ac847e5a643

Dihydrogen monoxide, sometimes referred to as dihydrogen oxide, is a colorless, odorless compound of two hydrogen atoms locked via a covalent bond with a single atom of oxygen. The resulting molecule is sometimes abbrevi...

www.reference.com/science/chemical-formula-dihydrogen-monoxide-a5954d558caa717d

CH4, commonly known as methane, is a tetrahedral structure with four hydrogen atoms forming around a central carbon atom. Pictorially, this structure resembles a pyramid in shape, with all four corners equidistant from t...

www.reference.com/science/molecular-geometry-ch4-8ccb8250c4ab9bb1