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www.northjersey.com/.../03/12/st-patricks-day-who-st-patrick-he-italian/415902002

But was St. Patrick Italian? L’Italo-Americano, the biweekly Italian-American organization established in 1908, insists on its website italoamericano.org that Patrick was, indeed, a paisan.

www.history.com/news/st-patricks-day-myths-debunked

Myth: St. Patrick was Irish. Though one of Ireland’s patron saints, Patrick was born in what is now England, Scotland or Wales—interpretations vary widely—to a Christian deacon and his wife ...

randazza.wordpress.com/2015/03/16/was-st-patrick-really-italian-2

Growing up there, in a town where Sicilians were the plurality, St. Patrick’s Day was always a little underwhelming. Instead, we celebrated St. Joseph’s day on March 19. Of course, every St. Joseph’s Day, someone would bring up the old story that St. Patrick’s day should be “our” day too — since St. Patrick was really Italian.

italoamericano.org/story/2015-3-16/Saint-Patrick

A “St. Patrick was Italian” remark, tossed into your March conversations, can ignite boring talk into boiling talk if you have some conversational fodder handy, to buttress your claim: The first St. Patrick’s Day in the U.S. was held in Boston in 1734. By stretching things a bit, you can correctly state that “St. Patrick was Italian”.

www.reference.com/world-view/saint-patrick-italian-9c3ef943dd743adc

There are many different legends of Saint Patrick, but Catholic Online states that his parents, Calpurnius and Conchessa, were Romans, making Saint Patrick of Italian decent, although he was born in Kilpatrick, Scotland.

www.irishcentral.com/opinion/others/italians-reclaim-st-patricks-day

Transitioning St. Patrick's Day to the Italians might change the complexion of the holiday just a teensy.. Read more: The special love-hate relationship between Irish and Italian Americans. If the ...

viaumbriablog.com/st-patrick-italian

As you could probably guess from the title of this blog post, we are going to suggest an unpopular and rarely heard theory about St. Patrick or San Patrizio: His heritage means he is Italian! Of course this theory is in jest and is more of an excuse for us to celebrate the holiday that … Continue reading St. Patrick was Italian? →

www.livinglanguage.com/.../09/the-mystery-of-st-patrick-was-he-really-from-ireland

St. Patrick’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland and a provincial holiday in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Did you know the original color of St. Patrick’s Day was blue? Though green is a very popular color on St. Patrick’s Day, the original color attributed to followers of St. Patrick was blue.

www.quora.com/Was-St-Patrick-Italian

Nope, Italy was created in 1861, while St. Patrick was born c379AD, in Bannavem Taburniae, somewhere in Roman Britain, to Calpurnius his father, who in turn was the son of Rev. Potitus (St. Patrick’s Confessio). His father was allegedly a tax coll...

guidogear.com/stpawasitt.html

St. Patrick Was Italian T-Shirt! According to the Catholic Church, he was born in Scotland, around the area now known as Kilpatrick ("cell of Patrick") and his parents (Calpurnius and Conchessa) were Romans living in Britain to watch over colonies.