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Although it is not an emergency, it is a good idea to have a veterinarian examine any warts or lumps that develop on a dog's skin. Wart-like growths can be a symptom of skin cancer. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Pets Veterinary Health

Owners who wish to treat their dogs' warts with home remedies can use vitamin E or castor oil, recommends Organic Pet Digest. However, dog warts generally clear up on their own without any treatment, explains PetMD. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Pets Veterinary Health

Treatment for oral warts include freezing, removing the wart surgically, laser treatments or injections, according to UK Health Centre. Most online sources discourage self-treatment of warts appearing on the face or in t... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Skin Conditions
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Contact the veterinarian of any dog that has eaten chocolate and let the vet know how much and what kind of chocolate the dog has eaten and how long it has been since the dog ate the chocolate, suggests VetsNow. This inf... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Pets Veterinary Health

Treat open sores with nonirritating cleansers, such as Vetericyn, and prescription ointments obtained from a veterinarian to help soothe the irritated skin and prevent infection. Joint or muscle pain may be treated with ... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Pets Veterinary Health

To stop a dog's scratching and skin problems, visit the veterinarian to determine the cause, check the dog's food, give supplements and medication, and groom and bathe carefully. The two main causes of skin irritation, n... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Pets Veterinary Health

A wart, or papilloma, is caused by the canine papilloma virus. The papilloma virus is highly contagious to other dogs and is transmitted orally through saliva. In some instances, papillomas and the papilloma virus are ge... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Pets Veterinary Health