ARTICLES

Chapter one of the book "To Kill a Mockingbird," written by Harper Lee and published in 1960, introduces the story of a little girl and her community in Maycomb, Alabama. Characters introduced in chapter one are "Scout,"...

www.reference.com/article/characters-introduced-chapter-one-kill-mockingbird-21c83ab46380c4ce

Harper Lee's use of Gothic elements in "To Kill A Mockingbird," such as the fire and the mad dog, escalates the suspense that faintly foreshadows Tom Robinson’s trial, its outcome and his subsequent tragic death. Other e...

www.reference.com/article/foreshadowing-kill-mockingbird-6265a46d03756859

The trial of Tom Robinson ends with Tom being found guilty in Harper Lee’s 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and the 1962 Academy Award-winning film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” The jury of white men convicts T...

www.reference.com/article/result-tom-robinson-trial-kill-mockingbird-c1bc1d27a1536324

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Dill runs away from home in chapter 14 of "To Kill a Mockingbird," by Harper Lee, because he thinks his mother and her new husband do not care about him. Scout and Jem find him hiding under Scout's bed after she steps on...

www.reference.com/article/dill-run-away-home-back-maycomb-429d5bff752f442c

Cecil Jacobs is the child who gave a presentation on "Old Adolf Hitler" as his current event topic in the book "To Kill A Mockingbird." Harper Lee wrote "To Kill A Mockingbird," which was published in 1960.

www.reference.com/article/identify-cecil-jacobs-aa5159c81c0fe225

"To Kill a Mockingbird," from Harper Lee's novel of the same name, is a metaphor that means "to hurt someone who has done no wrong." It references a comment in the novel by character Atticus Finch to his daughter Scout.

www.reference.com/world-view/kill-mockingbird-mean-b108e9c8f0250ce2

In the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, Scout was assigned to be the ham in the school pageant. Scout had trouble getting the costume on and off without help. She wore it home as Jem walked her home from the ...

www.reference.com/article/scout-s-part-pageant-ac54491558e52ab8