The rungs of the DNA ladder are made of complementary nitrogenous base pairs. DNA contains four different nitrogenous bases: adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine. The nitrogenous bases are divided into the purines and ... More »

The rungs of the DNA ladder consist of four nitrogenous bases: adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine. Each rung of the ladder is composed of two of the nitrogenous bases held together by hydrogen bonds. More »

The shape of a DNA molecule is called a double helix, which looks like a twisting ladder. The "rungs" are made from four nitrogenous bases: adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Sugars and phosphate groups are also par... More »

The steps, or rungs, of the DNA ladder are made up of two bases joined together with either two or three weak hydrogen bonds. The rails of the ladder are made up of alternating sugar and phosphate molecules. The rungs ar... More »

The rungs of the DNA ladder consist of four nitrogenous bases: adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine. Each rung of the ladder is composed of two of the nitrogenous bases held together by hydrogen bonds. More »

As shown on the NIH Genetics Home Reference site, when DNA molecules are represented as ladders, the rungs represent the base pairs of the DNA. The bases in DNA are often represented as G, A, T and C, which stand for gua... More »

The sides of the DNA ladder are made up of a combination of alternating sugars and phosphates. These molecules are what holds the rungs of DNA together on the ladder. More »