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A starfish eats by wrapping its arms around a bivalve's shell, prying it open, injecting its stomach into the shell and then digesting the prey. After digesting, it slides the stomach back into its body. This allows the ... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Starfish

Most starfish, also known as sea stars, eat by prying open the shells of prey such as clams or oysters with their arms, pushing their stomachs out their mouths and into the prey's shell, partially digesting the animal an... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Starfish

Starfish are eaten by sharks that live near the bottom of the ocean, such as nurse sharks, horn sharks and Port Jackson sharks. They are also preyed upon by manta rays, Alaskan king crabs and other starfish. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Starfish
similar articles

Most starfish, also known as sea stars, eat by prying open the shells of prey such as clams or oysters with their arms, pushing their stomachs out their mouths and into the prey's shell, partially digesting the animal an... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Starfish

The function of a starfish's spines is to provide protection from sea otters, fish and birds that hunt starfish for prey. The spines are made of calcium carbonate, which forms a series of plates on the top of the starfis... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Starfish

Starfish exhibit several unique adaptations that enable them to survive in the world’s oceans, including radially symmetrical bodies, unique tube feet that permit movement and the ability to regenerate lost arms. About 2... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Starfish

Starfish are eaten by sharks that live near the bottom of the ocean, such as nurse sharks, horn sharks and Port Jackson sharks. They are also preyed upon by manta rays, Alaskan king crabs and other starfish. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Starfish