Scholars believe Shakespeare wrote "Macbeth" to entertain and win the approval of King James I. Shakespeare's troupe, originally "The Lord Chamberlain's Men," changed its name to "The King's Men" to honor the new Scottis... More »

Though it is impossible to say exactly why William Shakespeare wrote "Macbeth," the political and historical context of the play gives scholars major clues. "Macbeth" serves as a cautionary tale for those who would threa... More »

Many scholars believe that Williams Shakespeare may have written his famous tragedy, "Macbeth," as a celebration of King James I. King James I of England had formerly been King James the VI of Scotland, and ascended to t... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

The Lord Chamberlain's Men, the acting company with which William Shakespeare was closely associated, changed its name in 1603 to the King's Men because James I ascended to the throne that year and took the troupe under ... More »

William Shakespeare wrote "Macbeth" as a way to express his patronage of King James I. Shakespeare uses "Macbeth" to please the king in various manners, with one of them alluding to the dreadful fate that befalls anyone ... More »

Shakespeare worked for an acting company called The Lord Chamberlain's Men starting in the early 1590s, which then changed its name to King's Men after King James I took the throne in 1603. The company was considered pop... More »

Lord Chamberlain's Men was the name of the acting troupe that William Shakespeare wrote and acted for, and of which he was a shareholder. Henry Carey, First Baron Hunsdon, who was also known as Lord Chamberlain, was the ... More »