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Examples of paradoxes in "Romeo and Juliet" include when Romeo says that his eyes cannot mislead him in manners of love, and when Friar Lawrence describes the earth as nature's tomb and womb. Romeo uses another paradox w... More »

Several examples of juxtaposition in "Romeo and Juliet" have to do with light contrasted with dark, as in Romeo's description of Juliet in Act I, Scene 5: "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night/ Like a rich jewel in... More »

The most well-known apostrophe in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" occurs in Act 2 Scene 2, in which Juliet asks the absent Romeo, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" Because an apostrophe can be defined as any time a ch... More »

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One example of oxymoron in "Romeo and Juliet" comes from Act I, scene i when Romeo says, "O brawling love! O loving hate!" William Shakespeare made plentiful use of oxymorons in his tragedy. An oxymoron is a statement or... More »

An example of blank verse in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is: "And, when he shall die, / Take him and cut him out in little stars, / And he will make the face of heaven so fine / That all the world will be in... More »

Friar Lawrence gives Juliet the potion as part of his plan for Juliet and Romeo to reunite and as a way for Juliet to avoid going through with her wedding to Paris, according to About.com's Shakespeare section. Friar Law... More »

The climax in the play "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare occurs with the deaths of both Romeo and Juliet inside of the Capulet tomb. The climax happens in Act 5, Scene 3, and it is in the same scene that the prin... More »