Contrary to myth and seeming lyrical evidence, the children's nursery rhyme "Ring Around the Rosie" is not a reference to either the physical symptoms or social condition of the bubonic plague, also known as the Black De... More »

The term "nursery rhyme" refers to a traditional song or poem for children, such as "Ring around the Rosie" or 'Remember Remember'. "Nursery rhyme" is a British phrase, but its equivalents, such as "Mother Goose Rhymes,"... More »

The line "Wednesday's child is full of woe" is a part of a nursery rhyme known as "Monday's Child," sometimes attributed to Mother Goose; it predicts that children born on Wednesday are sad. More »

"Black Death" refers to a 14th-century outbreak of the bubonic plague, a bacterial infection spread primarily by infected fleas, though the disease can also be transmitted by person-to-person contact in its pneumonic for... More »

Between 1328 and 1351, the bubonic plague, commonly known as the Black Death, killed approximately one third of the population of Europe. The widespread nature of the disease, along with its horrific symptoms, inspired E... More »

The Jack Sprat of the famous nursery rhyme about eating fat and lean is likely not a real person. Rather, the content of the rhyme seems related to the contrast between two people who like dramatically different things a... More »

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Funny stories for kids include "A, You're Adorable," the tongue twister "Betty Botter," the nursery rhyme "Bingo" and the "Brush-Your-Teeth Song." These amusing nursery rhymes are suitable for parents and children to rea... More »

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