The normal level of prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, is 4.0 nanograms per milliliter or lower. When a PSA test gives a higher result than this number, doctors can recommend a biopsy to confirm if prostate cancer is pre... More »

Normal levels for a prostate-specific antigen test vary by age, as older men commonly have slightly higher levels than younger men, explains MedlinePlus. A normal level is considered 4.0 nanograms per milliliter of blood... More »

www.reference.com Health Diagnostics & Imaging

The ranges for determining results of a prostate-specific antigen test vary from one lab to another, so there is no specific scale, notes WebMD. A particular lab may have a different range for what it considers normal. More »

www.reference.com Health Medical Ranges & Levels

An elevated prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, level indicates a greater risk of prostate cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. Men with PSA levels above 4.0 nanograms per milliliter are at added risk of ca... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

A prostate-specific antigen level higher than 4.0 nanograms per milliliter may indicate prostate cancer. However, PSA levels may be higher in men for other reasons, and men should understand the limitations of prostate s... More »

An elevated prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, test result can indicate a higher chance that prostate cancer is present, even if there are no other symptoms present. A continuous rise in PSA levels over time is also asso... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

An elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level can be a reading that is above 4.0 nanograms per deciliter, according to WebMD. However, PSA levels tend to increase as a man ages. If men have elevated PSA levels, it do... More »