Prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, levels tend to increase with age, according to the National Cancer Institute. Because of this, some doctors have suggested using age-specific PSA reference ranges as a screening tool fo... More »

Blood levels of the prostate-specific antigen increase with age. To reflect this phenomenon, the reference ranges for PSA levels in both healthy men and men at risk of prostate cancer increase with age, according to the ... More »

www.reference.com Health Medical Ranges & Levels

Normal prostate-specific antigen levels go up to 2.5 nanograms per milliliter for ages 40 to 49, 4.0 nanograms per milliliter for 50 to 59, 4.5 nanograms per milliliter for 60 to 69 and 6.5 nanograms per milliliter for 7... More »

Abnormal levels of PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, generally do not exist, states the National Cancer Institute. Historically, PSA levels above 4.0 nanograms per milliliter often required a prostate biopsy to test for... More »

The PSA level shows the amount of the prostate-specific antigen protein in a man's blood, according to the National Cancer Institute. PSA is manufactured by the prostate gland. High levels on a PSA blood test sometimes i... More »

www.reference.com Health Medical Ranges & Levels

No specific level of PSA is considered normal, as men with heightened or low levels of PSA can still have prostate cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. Doctors have historically considered PSA levels at or... More »

Prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, levels may rise due to prostate cancer, inflammation of the prostate, a urinary tract infection or an enlarged prostate, explains the National Cancer Institute. The PSA blood test is of... More »

www.reference.com Health Medical Ranges & Levels