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Depending on the composition of the stainless steel, a magnet may or may not stick to it. Stainless steels are alloyed steels containing iron, carbon and other components. The iron is strongly magnetic, but the other com... More »

www.reference.com Science Physics Magnetism

The alloy known as stainless steel is comprised primarily of iron combined with a minimum of 10.5 percent chromium. Other metals, such as nickel, molybdenum, titanium or copper, are added to the alloy in small amounts to... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry

Stainless steel is composed of iron, carbon and chromium. Modern stainless steel may also contain other elements, such as nickel, niobium, molybdenum and titanium. The elements of nickel, molybdenum, niobium and chromium... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry
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Magnets generally do stick to stainless steel, though exceptions to the rule can be found. Steel is composed mostly of iron, which is often naturally magnetic and can easily be magnetized. Magnetic stainless steel is usu... More »

www.reference.com Science Physics Magnetism

Type 304 stainless steel is not magnetic, according to Bosun Supplies Company. This steel, along with other 300-series stainless steel types, is an austenitic stainless steel. Unlike ferritic steels, austenitic steels do... More »

www.reference.com Science Physics Magnetism

Magnets do not stick to stainless steel refrigerators. This applies to refrigerators that are made of high grade stainless steel. More »

www.reference.com Science Physics Magnetism

An iron nail can be made into a magnet by wrapping it with insulated copper wire and letting low-voltage direct current run through the coil. The iron nail will become a temporary magnet. More »

www.reference.com Science Physics Magnetism