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The melting point of plastic depends on the polymer makeup of the plastic, and it can be low to high. The temperature at which a plastic melts is called the melt transition temperature because it is not defined. More »

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The melting point of polyethylene varies from 85?C to 145?C, depending on the type of polymer. Polyethene, which is another term for it, is a white and waxy polymer made up of only carbon and hydrogen. More »

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Polyurethane does not have a melting point because it is a thermosetting polymer, so when it is made, it becomes irreversibly hard. When exposed to extreme heat, polyurethane ignites and burns. More »

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The melting point of stainless steel varies according to the precise chemical makeup of the particular alloy, although the spectrum runs from 1,325 to 1,530 degrees Celsius. Melting range is important in the process of m... More »

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Tungsten has the highest melting point of the pure elements under normal atmospheric pressure, and tantalum hafnium carbide has the highest melting point of any substance. The melting point of tungsten is 3410 degrees Ce... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The melting point of ferrocene is 172.5 degrees C. Its empirical formula is C10H10Fe, and it has a boiling point of 249 degrees C. It is an organometallic compound. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

Polyurethane does not have a melting point because it is a thermosetting polymer, so when it is made, it becomes irreversibly hard. When exposed to extreme heat, polyurethane ignites and burns. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter