articles

As of 2014, the U.S. space program has lost two shuttle missions, with a loss of 14 astronauts' lives. The two lost shuttles were the Columbia, in 2003, and the Challenger in 1986. According to Space.com, the Columbia wa... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Space Travel

The NASA space shuttles, which ceased operation in 2011, orbited Earth at 17,500 miles per hour, according to SPACE.com. At this speed, the space shuttle traveled more than 5 miles every second. During operation, the spa... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Space Travel

According to the California Institute of Technology, a NASA space shuttle, by itself, weighed 165,000 pounds. When the weight of the external tank, the two solid rocket boosters and the fuel was included, the total weigh... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Space Travel
similar articles

Typical orbital paths for space shuttle missions covered regions between 57 degrees north and 57 degrees south of the equator and altitudes of between 155 and 600 miles depending on the mission profile. Orbital speeds we... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Space Travel

Two space shuttles have blown up. The Space Shuttle Challenger blew up in 1986 less than a minute and a half after launch. In 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia exploded upon re-entry. In both accidents, all crew members d... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Space Travel

NASA has operated six space shuttles, beginning with the prototype orbiter, which was flown in Earth's atmosphere during landing and flight tests. Two of the shuttles, Columbia and Challenger, were lost in accidents, and... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Space Travel

According to LiveScience, as of 2014, 18 astronauts have died during launches or re-entry from space, but none have been lost outside of the Earth's atmosphere. Additionally, three astronauts died in the Apollo 1 fire wh... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Space Travel