ARTICLES

Altitude sickness is the body's response to low oxygen levels at high altitudes, particularly when rapidly moving to altitudes above 8,000 feet, according to WebMD. Symptoms include headache, weakness, difficulty sleepin...

www.reference.com/article/altitude-sickness-ac0b11d90ef338e2

Using high-altitude training to prepare for sports entails living and training at a high altitude, living at a high altitude while training at a lower altitude, living at a lower altitude while training at a higher altit...

www.reference.com/article/use-high-altitude-training-prepare-sports-878466e2b8b92f69

Elevation above sea level affects a person's oxygen levels, according to WebMD. This is because air at higher altitudes is less dense and therefore contains lower concentrations of oxygen.

www.reference.com/article/elevation-above-sea-level-effect-person-s-oxygen-levels-50e8673ae8925b34

SIMILAR ARTICLES

An individual who is not accustomed to altitudes higher than 8,000 feet may experience altitude sickness if he ascends too quickly from a lower elevation because his body is unable to derive sufficient amounts of oxygen ...

www.reference.com/article/causes-elevation-sickness-6af5a447601bf12e

Altitude sickness can occur following a drop in air pressure at altitudes above 8,000 feet. Altitude sickness usually only occurs when a person has not been gradually exposed or acclimatized to the low air pressure in ad...

www.reference.com/article/point-drop-air-pressure-cause-altitude-sickness-c5cc151bfd420b02

Altitude sickness symptoms include headache, dizziness, nausea and shortness of breath that worsen at night, according to the NHS Choices. Severe altitude sickness symptoms include a persistent cough that produces pink o...

www.reference.com/article/symptoms-altitude-sickness-3999bf6229d8b393

Edema, the medical term for swelling, is the body's natural response to injury and has many causes, according to WebMD. Common causes for mild edema include sitting too long, pregnancy and drug side effects, states the M...

www.reference.com/article/types-causes-treatments-edema-7aff1abba2180ce4