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www.reference.com/article/nickel-used-7624e9ced7f4f249

Nickel is widely used in electronics, coinage, chemical reactions and the production of stainless steel. It is frequently used in an alloy form with iron and chromium.

www.reference.com/article/nickel-1cfe31ff982a3527

As of 2014, the nickel coin features a portrait of Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States. The reverse depicts Jefferson's Virginia home, Monticello. In 1938, the Jefferson nickel replaced the Indian head or Buffalo nickel design that had been in use sin...

www.reference.com/article/alloys-used-a8895eaec916ca59

Alloys mix metals with other elements to help harden and otherwise make them more useful. For example, gold is too soft to make good jewelry on its own, but it can be mixed with other elements, including harder metals like zinc and nickel, to help make it strong enough ...

www.reference.com/article/nickel-silver-21c96603e38a77c8

Nickel silver is an alloy made from 50 to 80 percent copper, 5 to 30 percent nickel, and 10 to 35 percent zinc. Although it is silvery in appearance, it is non-precious and contains no silver.

www.reference.com/article/color-nickel-922a4702e6fb2183

Nickel is silver white in color when the metal is in its natural form. Nickel compounds express in blue, green and yellow.

www.reference.com/article/nickel-made-518f8c551f06b3b9

Nickel is not manufactured or synthesized. It is an element with the chemical symbol "Ni" that occurs naturally in ores and minerals. It is also found in the Earth’s crust and occurs as a by-product of cobalt blue production. The Swedish chemist Axel Fredrik Cronstedt d...

www.reference.com/article/copper-metal-d0e146c61791cf50

Copper is a highly conductive, ductile metal. The metal is soft and malleable, although it does possess a great deal of tensile strength. This means that copper is easily formed by hand, but it is not suitable for building structures.