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literarydevices.net/mood

Usually, mood is referred to as the atmosphere of a literary piece, as it creates an emotional setting that surrounds the readers. Mood is developed in a literary piece through various methods, including setting, theme, tone, and diction.Let us see how writers use the afore-mentioned elements in their literary works to create a particular mood.

examples.yourdictionary.com/mood-examples.html

A mood is a feeling or a person's specific state of mind at any particular time. A mood is also the prevailing emotion found not only in people but also in literature, music, and other expressive arts. Moods set the overall tone for speech or writing and are an important element in literature as well as in everyday life.

www.litcharts.com/literary-devices-and-terms/mood

The following examples of mood are from different types of literature: plays, novels, and poems. In each, we identify how the author builds the mood of the work using a combination of setting, imagery, tone, diction, and plot. Mood in Hamlet.

writingexplained.org/grammar-dictionary/mood

Summary: Mood Literary Definition. Define mood in literature: The definition of mood in literature is the overall feeling and author creates for his audience. Mood is the atmosphere the text creates. In a way, it’s all of the “unsaid” elements that create a feeling the text provides for the audience. Mood is essential to engage readers.

literary-devices.com/content/mood

The literary device ‘mood’ refers to a definitive stance the author adopts in shaping a specific emotional perspective towards the subject of the literary work. It refers to the mental and emotional disposition of the author towards the subject, which in turn lends a particular character or atmosphere to the work.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mood_(literature)

In literature, mood is the atmosphere of the narrative. Mood is created by means of setting (locale and surroundings in which the narrative takes place), attitude (of the narrator and of the characters in the narrative), and descriptions. Though atmosphere and setting are connected, they may be considered separately to a degree.

writersedit.com/fiction-writing/literary-devices/literary-devices-mood

Mood, or atmosphere, is the general feeling a reader experiences as they read a piece of literature. It's both a tangible feeling and a constant intangible presence that powers a work's affective properties. The mood creates an emotional response in the audience and allows for greater understanding ...

www.storyboardthat.com/literary-terms/mood

The mood of a story can create foreshadowing, and it can fluctuate throughout the plot. Mood differs from tone in that the mood of a story is the reader’s relationship with the characters and events; the tone is the author’s attitude toward the characters and events unfolding in the plot.

www.thoughtco.com/mood-composition-and-literature-1691326

"The essay, as a literary form, resembles the lyric, in so far as it is molded by some central mood—whimsical, serious, or satirical. Give the mood, and the essay, from the first sentence to the last, grows around it as the cocoon grows around the silkworm. The essay writer is a chartered libertine and a law unto himself.

www.reference.com/education/mood-literature-bb43368290d3473f

Mood is a literary device authors use to evoke feelings within their readers. They create mood with their setting and character descriptions, tone and diction, or word choice. Mood and tone are commonly confused literary terms. Mood typically refers to the atmosphere created within the story, while tone is the author's attitude toward the subject.