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Concrete mixing ratios are the formula for calculating the correct amount of each ingredient used, including water, cement, sand and aggregate, to produce concrete with the properties desired. A basic concrete ratio is o... More »

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One rule for mixing concrete is 1 part cement and 2 parts sand to 3 parts aggregates by volume or about 10 to 15 percent cement, 60 to 75 percent aggregate and 15 to 20 percent water by weight. Entrained air in many conc... More »

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Stamp concrete by spraying the stamps with a release agent, pressing them into the wet material and lifting them out to leave the pattern. Use a tamper or step on the stamp to press it into the material. Repeat the proce... More »

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Concrete is a mixture of cement, water and aggregates, such as sand, coarse gravel or crushed rock. After it hardens, concrete is resilient, durable, resistant to environmental extremes and capable of supporting heavy lo... More »

www.reference.com Home & Garden Home Maintenance Building Materials

One rule for mixing concrete is 1 part cement and 2 parts sand to 3 parts aggregates by volume or about 10 to 15 percent cement, 60 to 75 percent aggregate and 15 to 20 percent water by weight. Entrained air in many conc... More »

www.reference.com Home & Garden Home Maintenance Building Materials

Concrete is composed of aggregates, which can be any or a combination of sand, gravel or rocks that is held together by cement. The cement itself, when mixed with water, serves as a paste that holds all the components of... More »

www.reference.com Home & Garden Home Maintenance Building Materials

Concrete does not actually have a melting point, but it decomposes into various components due to the makeup of concrete, which is mostly sand and gravel with Portland cement added. A temperature of thousands of degrees ... More »

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