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About reports the melting point of gold is 1,064.43 degrees Celsius. The melting point of a solid is the temperature at which it becomes a liquid. Gold's boiling point is 2,807 degrees Celsius. More »

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Brass, an alloy of copper and zinc, melts at between 900 and 940 degrees Celsius. Since different types of brass use different proportions of copper and zinc, and sometimes include other metals such as lead, tin, or nick... More »

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The melting point of copper is 1,984.31 degrees Fahrenheit, or 1,084.62 degrees Celsius. According to the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), its boiling point is 4,643.6 degrees Fahrenheit, or 2,562 degrees Celsius. More »

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Sodium chloride has a high melting point because of the strong electrostatic attraction between its positive and negative ions; this requires more heat energy to overcome. All ionic compounds have high melting points for... More »

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The presence of impurities in a substance results in a lower melting point due to a process called melting point depression. Melting point depression is the reason why adding salt to frozen streets helps to melt the ice. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

Sugar does not have a fixed melting point. Instead, as sugar increases in temperature, its molecules began to decompose. While heating sugar does produce a more fluid product known as caramel, it does not retain its chem... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The melting point of pure 24-carat gold is 1945 degrees Fahrenheit. This is fairly average for a metal, being three times higher than the melting point of lead and a third of the melting point of tungsten. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter