https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminosity

In astronomy, luminosity is the total amount of energy emitted per unit of time by a star, galaxy, or other astronomical object. As a term for energy emitted per unit ...

https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/stellar-luminosity-the-true-brightness-of-stars

Feb 18, 2017 ... Some extremely large and hot stars blaze away with the luminosity of a million suns! But other stars look bright only because they're near Earth.

https://www.atnf.csiro.au/outreach//education/senior/astrophysics/photometry_luminosity.html

Luminosity of stars page for astrophysics option for NSW HSC Physics.

https://astro.unl.edu/naap/hr/hr_background2.html

Luminosity is the total energy that a star produces in one second. It depends on both the radius of the star and on its surface temperature. One can calculate ...

https://www.space.com/21640-star-luminosity-and-magnitude.html

Oct 11, 2017 ... The brightness of a star is measured several ways: how it appears from Earth, ... Astronomers also measure luminosity — the amount of energy ...

https://www.astronomynotes.com/starprop/s4.htm

Nov 2, 2010 ... The absolute magnitude is a measure of the star's luminosity---the total amount of energy radiated by the star every second. If you measure a ...

http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/cosmos/L/Luminosity

The luminosity of an object is a measure of its intrinsic brightness and is ... this way, the luminosity of a star might be expressed as 10 solar luminosities (10 L⊙)  ...

http://homepage.physics.uiowa.edu/~pkaaret/s09/L10_stars.pdf

Luminosity - A star produces light – the total amount of energy that a star puts out as light each second is called its Luminosity. • Flux - If we have a light detector ...

https://www.universetoday.com/24783/star-luminosity/

Feb 6, 2009 ... As a baseline, astronomers measure the luminosity of other stars against the power of the Sun. So here's the luminosity of the Sun: 3.839 x ...

http://hosting.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/lumin_star.htm

The Luminosity of a star depends on BOTH its temperature and its radius (surface area):. L is proportional to R2 T4. A hotter star is more luminous than a cooler ...