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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_Philippines

There is a language spoken by the Tao people (also known as Yami) of Orchid Island of Taiwan which is not included in the language of the Philippines. Their language, Tao (or Yami) is part of the Batanic languages which includes Ivatan, Babuyan, and Itbayat of the Batanes.

www.csun.edu/~lan56728/majorlanguages.htm

MAJOR LANGUAGES OF THE PHILIPPINES Major Languages of Philippines is from another website The Philippines has 8 major dialects. Listed in the figure from top to bottom: Bikol, Cebuano, Hiligaynon (Ilonggo), Ilocano, Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Tagalog, and Waray.

www.ethnicgroupsphilippines.com/people/languages-in-the-philippines

According to linguists, there are around 5,000 languages spoken in today’s world. The Philippines alone has over 170 languages and 4 that have no known remaining speakers.. Alarmingly, according to current estimates, only one-tenth of today’s languages will remain by the coming of the 22nd century.

www.justlanded.com/.../Language/Language-in-the-Philippines

Official languages in the Philippines. The original official language of the Philippines was Spanish for many centuries until the early half of the 20th century. Then, under US occupation, English was introduced into schools and in 1935 English was added to the constitution alongside Spanish as a national language.

encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Languages+of+the...

Philippine Languages the languages of the indigenous population of the islands of the Philippines, spoken by 41.5 million people (1975, estimate). The Philippine languages constitute a subgroup of the Indonesian (Malayan) group (seeINDONESIAN LANGUAGES), or western branch, of the Malayo-Polynesian (Austronesian) language family (seeMALAYO-POLYNESIAN ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filipino_language

Its literary tradition is the richest of all native Philippine languages, the most developed and extensive (mirroring that of the Tuscan language vis-à-vis Italian). More books are written in Tagalog than in any other autochthonous Philippine language but Spanish, but this is mainly by virtue of law and .

www.asianinfo.org/asianinfo/philippines/pro-languages.htm

Filipino (formerly Pilipino) is based on Tagalog and is the official language of the Philippines. In spite of being the national language, only about 55 percent of Filipinos speak the language. In addition to Filipino are about 111 distinct indigenous languages and dialects, of which only about 10 are important regionally.

faq.ph/top-10-languages-used-in-the-philippines

Foreign languages that became an official language of the Philippines. Spanish and English are two languages we Filipinos got used to when we were still under the governance of Spain and America. Spanish – used to be the official language in the Philippines back in the 16th century but now, only around 2,000 Filipinos use this language.

www.ethnologue.com/country/PH

The number of individual languages listed for Philippines is 185. Of these, 183 are living and 2 are extinct. Of the living languages, 175 are indigenous and 8 are non-indigenous. Furthermore, 39 are institutional, 67 are developing, 38 are vigorous, 28 are in trouble, and 11 are dying.

www.ethnologue.com/country/PH/languages

Recognized language (2018, Republic Act, No. 11106), Recognized as the national sign language of the deaf and with a mandate for use in schools, broadcast media, and workplaces. Alternate Names: FSL, Local Sign Language, Philippine Sign Language. Classification: Sign language. More Information