Ladybugs can indeed bite. According to Dr. Linda Gilkeson, a former beneficial insect specialist with the Canadian government, ladybugs have no toxins or irritating saliva, so their bites are not dangerous; however, thei... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Beetles

Most species of ladybug are not aggressive towards humans and therefore do not bite. All ladybugs have mouth parts that can be used for biting, but they are generally used for consuming small pest insects, such as the ap... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Beetles

Yes, some ladybugs may bite. In particular, the multicolored Asian lady beetle, while not aggressive toward humans in general, has been reported to bite. Though they are not poisonous, the bite may hurt and develop a red... More »

Ladybugs' bright red color exists to frighten predators away from eating them. Despite their name, ladybugs are actually beetles and are not members of the true bug family, which includes ladybugs' favorite food, aphids.... More »

There are no true green ladybugs. However, certain species of spotted cucumber beetles resemble ladybugs, and there are vivid yellow ladybug beetles that may appear green under certain lighting conditions. More »

Ladybugs are not poisonous, but they secrete a foul-tasting liquid when threatened by predators. This fluid is secreted from their joints. A threatened ladybug can also play dead to protect itself from a predator. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Beetles

There are female and male species of ladybugs, and they reproduce sexually. The male ladybug crawls on the back of the female ladybug as they mate. More »