As of 2015, lunch breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are not considered work time and are not compensable, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Furthermore, federal labor law does not require employers to provid... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics Law

Federal law doesn't require rest breaks or lunch breaks, although many states mandate how long breaks must be and when they must occur in the workday, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Companies that offer rest ... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics Law

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t regulate the number or length of breaks or lunches, according to the Houston Chronicle. However, OSHA requires businesses to provide restroom facilities, and it m... More »

www.reference.com Business & Finance Business Resources

Federal law doesn't require rest breaks or lunch breaks, although many states mandate how long breaks must be and when they must occur in the workday, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Companies that offer rest ... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics Law

The federal government doesn't require lunch breaks, although some states have laws regulating meal periods, according to the National Federation of Independent Business. The government doesn’t require employers to pay e... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics Law

Federal U.S. labor laws include the Fair Labor Standards Act, which mandates a minimum wage and overtime pay of 1 1/2 times the normal rate, says the Department of Labor. The act limits the hours children under 16 can wo... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics Law

Federal law exempts contracts worth less than $2,000 from the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The Davis-Bacon and Related Acts do apply to contractors and subcontractors performin... More »