The majority of motor oils are not flammable. However, all motor oils are combustible and should be handled with caution around heat sources of any type. More »

All cooking oils are flammable when they reach a certain temperature. Cooking oil is rated by the National Fire Protection Association as a Class IIIB combustible liquid with a flash point of 200 C or greater. More »

Because motor oil does not crystallize, or solidify, at any temperature, it technically does not freeze. However, motor oil at freezing temperatures will begin to thicken, losing the viscosity that allows the oil to flow... More »

Because motor oil does not crystallize, or solidify, at any temperature, it technically does not freeze. However, motor oil at freezing temperatures will begin to thicken, losing the viscosity that allows the oil to flow... More »

The majority of motor oil freezes at approximately -90 degrees Fahrenheit. When oil has a higher number, it has a higher viscosity, meaning it is thicker, and its flow worsens as it gets colder. More »

Although helium is volatile due to its light weight and physical properties, it is chemically inactive and is, therefore, not flammable. For an object to be flammable, it must be able to react with an oxidant, such as ox... More »

Titanium is flammable, but only when heated in air at temperatures of 610 degrees Celsius or higher. At that temperature, Titanium undergoes a chemical reaction with the hot air, and eventually forms titanium dioxide. Ti... More »