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Humans are unable to digest cellulose because they do not have necessary enzymes required for cellulose digestion, nor do they have symbiotic bacteria to perform the digestion for them; they can digest starch because the... More »

www.reference.com Science Biology

Humans lack the enzymes needed to successfully digest cellulose as a whole. Only small amounts of cellulose, or what is commonly known as fiber, remain intact after leaving the digestive system. More »

www.reference.com Health Nutrition & Diets

Humans lack the enzymes needed to successfully digest cellulose as a whole. Only small amounts of cellulose, or what is commonly known as fiber, remain intact after leaving the digestive system. More »

www.reference.com Health Nutrition & Diets
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The digestion of starch begins in the mouth. Saliva contains an enzyme that digests starch before it enters the stomach. This makes the starch easier for the body to metabolize, providing the body with energy just a litt... More »

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