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The terminal velocity of a free-falling human depends on the mass and density of the person. In general, the heavier the body, the longer it can accelerate before drag holds it at a constant speed. For a typical human, t... More »

www.reference.com Science Human Anatomy

The terminal velocity of the average-sized house cat is 60 miles per hour. This is assuming that the cat has all four limbs extended, increasing its drag relative to its weight. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Pets Cats

Terminal velocities of bullets vary by caliber, but can reach 300 to 700 feet per second. For example, a .30 caliber bullet's terminal velocity is 300 feet per second. If the bullet is shot at an angle and keeps its arc,... More »

www.reference.com Science Physics Motion & Mechanics
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Unlike other parts of the human body, the ears and nose continue to grow for a person's entire life. This is because the nose and ears contain cartilage, which never stops growing. More »

www.reference.com Science Human Anatomy

A calcified granuloma is an area of inflammation in tissue that has calcified over time until it has the same density as bone. The most common cause for a granuloma in the lungs is a fungal infection called histoplasmosi... More »

www.reference.com Science Human Anatomy

The density of muscle is about 18 percent greater than that of fat. So while a pound of fat and a pound of muscle weigh the same amount, five pounds of muscle occupy approximately the same amount of space as four pounds ... More »

www.reference.com Science Human Anatomy

How people float is based on their specific density, so people who float have a lower density than people who don't float well. Specifically, people with a higher fat content in their bodies float better than people with... More »

www.reference.com Science Human Anatomy