Article III of the Constitution states that judicial officers, or federal judges, are appointed for a life term. A federal judge may also end their term by resigning. More »

The Supreme Court justices in the United States have a life tenure. Up until 1970, most justices served an average of less than 15 years. More »

Federal judges who serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, in the federal appellate courts or in district courts do not have a set term of office. They are allowed to serve as long as they like, provided that they remain person... More »

The term of a federal judge according to Article III of the Constitution, is for life. The President nominates a judge and it is confirmed by the Senate. More »

The Federal Judicial Center states that federal judges have life tenure to deter intimidation when making unpopular decisions and cite Gregg v. Georgia as an example. In this case, the Supreme Court ruled that federal an... More »

Federal judges who serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, in the federal appellate courts or in district courts do not have a set term of office. They are allowed to serve as long as they like, provided that they remain person... More »

The Supreme Court justices in the United States have a life tenure. Up until 1970, most justices served an average of less than 15 years. More »