According to the National Center for Atmospheric Research, external winds can propel hurricanes across the ocean at sustained speeds of between 10 and 20 mph. Internally, hurricanes' wind speed is considerably higher. More »

Hurricanes are blown around the planet by the prevailing global winds. When a hurricane forms in the Atlantic Ocean, it comes together in a band of winds called the trade winds, which blow east to west in the low latitud... More »

The minimum sustained wind speed required for a tropical storm system to be classified as a hurricane is 74 mph, but tropical cyclones have been recorded with wind speeds as high as 215 mph. However, only tropical system... More »

Hurricanes have winds of at least 74 miles per hour, according to NASA. Hurricanes aren't the only storms that produce winds this fast, so these storms are categorized by their combination of fast-moving, swirling winds ... More »

Hurricanes are blown around the planet by the prevailing global winds. When a hurricane forms in the Atlantic Ocean, it comes together in a band of winds called the trade winds, which blow east to west in the low latitud... More »

Hurricanes are formed by rain clouds that grow over warm ocean waters. The clouds build to create wind speeds higher than 74 miles per hour. While tornadoes can attack without warning, hurricanes form over a period of da... More »

Hurricanes form in the open ocean, with the majority coming together in the western Pacific Ocean or the eastern Atlantic, off the coast of Africa. A smaller number form in the Gulf of Mexico or the Indian Ocean each yea... More »

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