Eubacteria and archaebacteria have several key biological differences, primarily in the membrane and wall structure of their cells. Eubacteria and archaebacteria have similar general cell structures, but the composition ... More »

Eubacteria and archaebacteria have a wide variety of shapes. However, these cell types have no membrane-bound organelles, they do not organize their DNA into a nucleus, and they are contained by cell membranes protected ... More »

Eubacteria fall into four primary categories, which are gram-positive eubacteria, proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and spirochetes. Eubacteria are much more common than archaebacteria, which are closely related members of t... More »

Eubacteria organisms, also referred to as true bacteria, are organisms that are complex yet singled-celled. An example of bacteria in the Eubacteria kingdom are Streptococci, the bacterium responsible for strep throat. S... More »

Eubacteria reproduce asexually through binary fusion. Binary fusion is a complete replication of the bacteria's genetic material that results in one parent cell dividing into two identical bacteria cells. It can occur ra... More »

Eubacteria are single-celled organisms capable of obtaining nutrition by using organic carbon, photosynthesis and chemosynthesis. Eubacteria may be categorized based on how they obtain nutrients. More »

Eubacteria are one of the two major groups of single cell organisms that lack nuclei and many other organelles found in eukaryotes. They have vast diversity, with a wide range of habitats and lifestyles, but all either h... More »