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www.reference.com/article/horizontal-line-2c24f9f11c6f85b3

A horizontal line is a straight line that goes from left to right, which can be open or closed in form. On a coordinate plane, a horizontal line runs parallel to the x-axis.

www.reference.com/article/way-horizontal-d26f5f8c75cc0592

A horizontal line runs parallel to the horizon, at a 90 degree angle to a vertical line. A person lying down in a flat position would create a horizontal line; a standing person would create a vertical line.

www.reference.com/article/slope-horizontal-line-7121e2f00f924c53

The slope of any horizontal line is always zero. The word "slope" is defined as the incline or the steepness of a straight line. If a line is horizontal, there is no incline.

www.reference.com/world-view/difference-between-vertical-horizontal-lines-9e8e73a2eba24c24

Horizontal lines are parallel to the horizon or parallel to level ground. They have a slope of zero and are parallel to the x-axis on a graph. Vertical lines are perpendicular to the horizon, parallel to the y-axis on a graph and have undefined slope.

www.reference.com/business-finance/horizontal-communication-54cee189e9c132c9

Horizontal communication refers to the interaction among people within the same level of hierarchical structure in organizations. Horizontal communication includes the relay of information between and among individuals, units and departments that fall into the same leve...

www.reference.com/article/horizontal-structure-be2400ef6676b14d

A horizontal structure in a business means the company has little to no middle management and top managers interact directly with customers. This type of flat structure is fairly common in small companies.

www.reference.com/world-view/horizontal-component-59bb4ae3e821b715

In science, the horizontal component of a force is the part of the force that is moving directly in a parallel line to the horizontal axis. For example, when a football is kicked, the force of the kick can be divided into a horizontal component, which is moving the foot...