ARTICLES

Genetic mutations, both inherited and acquired, are one primary cause of high red blood cell counts, also known as polycythemia, says MedicineNet. Sleep apnea and tumors are secondary causes of polycythemia.

www.reference.com/article/causes-high-red-blood-cell-count-6720c67fa5e3ffa1

Typical symptoms of a high red blood cell count include fatigue and weakness, joint pain, itching and headaches, according to MedicineNet. In cases where this condition is accompanied by risk factors such as cancer of th...

www.reference.com/world-view/symptoms-high-red-blood-cell-count-16ef92fe1e539b2c

An elevated red blood cell count is associated with dehydration, congenital heart disease, kidney tumors, bone marrow diseases and scarring of the lungs, reports MedlinePlus. Red blood cells contain hemoglobin, a protein...

www.reference.com/world-view/high-red-blood-cell-count-mean-3a50868f74809f2e

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Typical symptoms of a high red blood cell count include fatigue and weakness, joint pain, itching and headaches, according to MedicineNet. In cases where this condition is accompanied by risk factors such as cancer of th...

www.reference.com/world-view/symptoms-high-red-blood-cell-count-16ef92fe1e539b2c

Among the treatments doctors can give to bring down a high red blood cell count are drawing the patient's blood, and giving them medication to bring down the count or prevent the blood from coagulating, according to WebM...

www.reference.com/world-view/doctors-bring-down-high-red-blood-cell-count-93f830075b2c2201

A normal white blood cell count is any number between 4,500 and 10,000 white blood cells per microliter of blood. Normal values may be different in different laboratories throughout the United States.

www.reference.com/article/normal-white-blood-cell-count-d75d83f602b7b7ae

The normal white blood cell count for children is between 5,000 and 10,000 white blood cells per microliter of blood. When white blood cells drop below 1,000, the chances of infection increase.

www.reference.com/article/normal-white-blood-cell-count-children-fc4bc93d06b23ead