Vitamin K is primarily good for helping blood form clots when the skin is cut or bruised. The lack of vitamin K in an individual's system could result in too much bleeding, even from simple scrapes. More »

www.reference.com Health Nutrition & Diets Nutritional Amounts & Limits

Vitamin K helps blood coagulate properly, states the Harvard School for the Public Health. In fact, vitamin K is responsible for creating four of the 13 proteins needed for blood clotting in the body. Vitamin K also help... More »

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Leafy green vegetables, such as spinach, kale and mustard greens, are the best sources for vitamin K. Other vegetables, such as Brussels sprouts, cabbage, asparagus and broccoli, are also good sources. More »

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There is not enough evidence to show the effects of taking too much of vitamin K, as stated by NHS. Vitamin K is considered to be safe when injected or taken by mouth and is found in several foods, including Brussels spr... More »

Vitamin K-2 is a part of a group of compounds that makes up Vitamin K, as stated by WebMD. Vitamin K-2 is usually obtained from meat, eggs and cheese. Some bacteria are also able to synthesize vitamin K-2. More »

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Foods that contain Vitamin K include kale, collard greens, spinach, Brussels sprouts, strawberries and broccoli. Many plant greens, such as mustard greens, beet greens and dandelion greens, are also a top source of the n... More »

www.reference.com Health Nutrition & Diets Nutritional Content

Vitamin K helps blood coagulate properly, states the Harvard School for the Public Health. In fact, vitamin K is responsible for creating four of the 13 proteins needed for blood clotting in the body. Vitamin K also help... More »

www.reference.com Health Medications & Vitamins Vitamins & Supplements