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www.diffen.com/difference/Felony_vs_Misdemeanor

A felony is a more serious crime than a misdemeanor and carries much higher penalties, such as long-term jail sentencing. For example, murder or armed robbery are felonies, while shoplifting — typically a nonviolent crime — is a misdemeanor. In several states, possession of small amounts of ...

criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-law-basics/what...

Most criminal systems for states across the United States divide their crimes into several different categories depending on how serious they are. The basic categories are felony and misdemeanor and they are distinguished by how much jail time (if any) a defendant could face. Learn more about this and similar topics by visiting FindLaw's Criminal Law Basics section.

felonyguide.com/Felony-vs-misdemeanor.php

Felony vs. Misdemeanor In general a felony is a much more serious charge (and subsequent conviction) than a misdemeanor. Felonies typically carry punishments of at least one year in prison and up to (and including) the death penalty in some states.

criminal.laws.com/felony/felony-versus-misdemeanor

Thus, the meaning of the felony vs. misdemeanor relationship is one of degree. Much like felonies, though, misdemeanors will certainly be assigned a monetary fine that can range anywhere from $200 to about $10,000, far less than the $250,000 fine a Federal felony may potentially result in, and additional punishments, like mandatory rehabilitation programs and community service, will typically ...

www.brownfirmpllc.com/felony-vs-misdemeanor-difference

One of the many things that a criminal defense attorney can do for you is walk you through felonies vs. misdemeanors and help you argue that the charged crime should be a misdemeanor. Contact The Brown Law Firm PLLC as soon as possible after you realize that you or a loved one has been charged with a crime.

www.quickanddirtytips.com/business-career/legal/the...

A misdemeanor is generally a crime that is punishable for a year or less in prison, or only in a county or local jail. Some states, such as California, have alternative felony/misdemeanor crimes, also known as wobblers. A wobbler is a crime that can be charged as a felony or a misdemeanor based on the circumstances.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Misdemeanor

For example, in some jurisdictions the crime of indecent exposure might normally be classified as a misdemeanor, but be charged as a felony when committed in front of a minor. Typical misdemeanors and sentences. In the US, graffiti is a common form of misdemeanor vandalism, although in many states it is now a felony.

www.lawyerlocator.com/criminal-defense/types-of-criminal...

Some jurisdictions do not offer jury trials for some kinds of misdemeanors, and your case may only be heard by a judge. Other jurisdictions may not offer you a court-appointed attorney in misdemeanor cases. Although a misdemeanor will stay on your criminal record, it is generally easier to have it expunged, or erased, than a felony. Felonies

carlsonmeissner.com/difference-between-felony-misdemeanor

Felony vs. Misdemeanor The Difference Between A Felony & A Misdemeanor. What is the difference between a felony charge and a misdemeanor charge? Essentially, the difference between a felony and a misdemeanor is the seriousness of the crime and the punishment for the crime. When convicted of a felony, you can go to state prison for more than one ...

www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/crimes-felonies...

"Wobblers": Felony or Misdemeanor. A "wobbler" is an offense that may be prosecuted as a felony or as a misdemeanor. An offense that was prosecuted as a felony may also be downgraded to a misdemeanor at the time of sentencing. This occurs when statutes authorize judges to punish offenders as either misdemeanants or felony offenders.