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Cinder cone volcanoes form when high temperatures and pressure melt rock deep inside the Earth. Once a large amount of magma forms, it rises until it reaches the surface, creating an eruption. More »

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Cinder-cone volcanoes, properly called scoria volcanoes, erupt when expanding gas bubbles drive lava to the volcano's surface. Because of this pressure, the lava fountains are usually very high and vertical. By the time ... More »

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Cinder cone, or scoria cone, volcanoes are cone-shaped hills that form when lava fragments are ejected from localized vents and pile up and solidify around the opening. Cinder cones can be standalone formations or develo... More »

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Cinder cone volcanoes generally spew lava dramatically when they erupt, though the eruptions are not particularly dangerous to human populations. Dramatic and beautiful as the eruptions may be, they are quite insignifica... More »

www.reference.com Science Earth Science Volcanoes

Cinder cone, or scoria cone, volcanoes are cone-shaped hills that form when lava fragments are ejected from localized vents and pile up and solidify around the opening. Cinder cones can be standalone formations or develo... More »

www.reference.com Science Earth Science Volcanoes

Cinder cone volcanoes are made of material called scoria, a low density form of basalt. Scoria forms as gases in the lava try to force their way out of the molten material through a vertical path. More »

www.reference.com Science Earth Science Volcanoes

Some of the most well known cinder cone volcanoes in the world include Mauna Kea in Hawaii and Mount Etna in Sicily, Italy. Cinder cone volcanoes are the most common form of volcano in the world. More »

www.reference.com Science Earth Science Volcanoes