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The Nile is the longest river in the world at 4,132 miles long and is the site and lifeblood of the ancient Egyptian civilization. The name of the Nile comes from the Greek word "neilos," which may be derived from the Se... More »

www.reference.com Geography Bodies of Water

In the 1700s, the village of Niles was first settled by Potawatomi Indians before its official city incorporation in 1899. The first pioneers settled from Germany and favored the area for its rich farmland and low cost. More »

www.reference.com Geography United States The Midwest

The Nile River was originally used a food source for the Egyptian civilization. Researchers believe that the Egyptian people began living around the river in 6,000 B.C.E. More »

www.reference.com Geography Bodies of Water
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The Nile is a freshwater river, and it supplies Egypt with the majority of its fresh water. Historically, Nile River civilizations were able to avoid the problem of excessive salt ruining arable land by using the natural... More »

www.reference.com Geography Bodies of Water

There are a variety of animals that live near or on the Nile River, including the Nile crocodile, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, monitor lizard, perch, catfish, red-billed ibis and the pied kingfisher. The animal most synonym... More »

www.reference.com Geography Bodies of Water

The longest river in the world is the Nile. It is 4,160 miles long and is located in northeastern Africa. It passes through eleven countries including Uganda, Ethiopia and the Republic of Congo and is the primary water s... More »

www.reference.com Geography Bodies of Water

The Amazon, Nile and Mississippi rivers have a number of similarities, including several very large tributaries, a mouth that empties into a major ocean or gulf and incredible size. More »

www.reference.com Geography Bodies of Water