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www.reference.com/world-view/express-powers-congress-2a465a742e4bee39

The express powers of Congress are those powers granted specifically in the United States Constitution, which include the ability to make laws, amend the Constitution and declare war. Additionally, Congress is also responsible for the United States Postal Service. The H...

www.reference.com/article/example-power-expressed-power-congress-d95fc62fa1b92de

One power that is not an expressed power of Congress is the power to grant reprieves and pardons. This power is given to the President of the United States. The President can also make war even when Congress has not declared war.

www.reference.com/article/list-expressed-powers-congress-available-ef12033cd67e8de

A list of the expressed powers of Congress, that is, those powers expressly enumerated or granted by Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution, can be found in the Model Congress section of Princeton University's website. They include the powers to set and ...

www.reference.com/article/powers-congress-693fc86395155c5b

Congress has the power to make new laws, change existing laws, raise and support armed forces, declare war, establish post offices, secure patents and copyrights, collect taxes, regulate commerce, oversee the national budget and regulate other aspects of national financ...

www.reference.com/article/power-congress-c765724a04c749d4

According to the U.S. Constitution, Congress cannot grant individuals or groups titles of nobility, pass laws that punish specific individuals or groups, retroactively make something illegal or suspend people's right to know why they are being charged with a crime. This...

www.reference.com/world-view/expressed-powers-73cef9c3c8a4159

"Expressed powers," are powers granted to the government mostly found in Article I, Section 8 of the US Constitution within 18 clauses. Expressed powers, also known as the "enumerated powers," include the power to coin money, regulate foreign and interstate commerce, de...

www.reference.com/article/important-power-congress-d117b177ac53b8d

The most important power of Congress is the authority to make laws. A bill, also known as a proposed law, only becomes an official law after the House of Representatives and Senate have both approved it.