An irrevocable trust is a trust that cannot be modified or terminated by the grantor, according to WebFinance. There are two types of irrevocable trusts: the living irrevocable trust and the testamentary trust. More »

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Benefits of a revocable living trust include privacy in estate planning, the possibility of planning for mental disability and other incapacitating circumstances, and the avoidance of probate, states About.com. Revocable... More »

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A revocable living trust is created through the grantor's signature on a living trust document and the transfer of all property into the name of the trust, according to Nolo. The grantor is the individual for whom the tr... More »

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To dissolve a trust, the trust's grantor transfers all assets of the trust back into the trust fund owner's name, completes a Revocation of Trust form and submits it to the court where the trust is filed, according to Le... More »

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A revocable living trust is created through the grantor's signature on a living trust document and the transfer of all property into the name of the trust, according to Nolo. The grantor is the individual for whom the tr... More »

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There are a few ways that someone can change an irrevocable trust; the easiest way is when the beneficiaries and the grantor of the trust agree to the changes. The grantor must be alive at the time of modification. This ... More »

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To establish a trust, a grantor decides the terms, works with a trustee to establish the trust and transfers assets. A trustee may be an attorney, bank or other entity, states Investopedia. The transfer of assets is irre... More »

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