articles

Romeo speaks an aside in Act II, Scene ii of "Romeo and Juliet" when he is standing beneath the balcony where Juliet is speaking, unaware that anyone hears her. Juliet is professing her love for Romeo, and he says "Shall... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

Essentially, an aside is something said by character for the audience's benefit, but it is not meant to be heard by the other characters. Asides are usually a character speaking to themselves, though sometimes characters... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Plays

Similarities between "West Side Story" and "Romeo and Juliet" include the central conflict, the setting where the two main characters meet, the balcony scene and the violent conflict between the characters. Like "Romeo a... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics
similar articles

An example of blank verse in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is: "And, when he shall die, / Take him and cut him out in little stars, / And he will make the face of heaven so fine / That all the world will be in... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

One example of oxymoron in "Romeo and Juliet" comes from Act I, scene i when Romeo says, "O brawling love! O loving hate!" William Shakespeare made plentiful use of oxymorons in his tragedy. An oxymoron is a statement or... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

Several examples of juxtaposition in "Romeo and Juliet" have to do with light contrasted with dark, as in Romeo's description of Juliet in Act I, Scene 5: "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night/ Like a rich jewel in... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

The most well-known apostrophe in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" occurs in Act 2 Scene 2, in which Juliet asks the absent Romeo, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" Because an apostrophe can be defined as any time a ch... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics