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www.cprandfirstaid.net/first-aid/electrocution.html

Electrocution. The danger from an electrical shock depends on how high the voltage is, how the current traveled through the body, the person's overall health, and how quickly the person is treated.

www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-electrical-shock/...

The danger from an electrical shock depends on the type of current, how high the voltage is, how the current traveled through the body, the person's overall health and how quickly the person is treated.

www.webmd.com/first-aid/electric-shock-treatment

Electric Shock Treatment. In this Article ... A. American College of Emergency Physicians First Aid and CPR Essentials, ... Electric Shock Information from eMedicineHealth.

www.emedicinehealth.com/electric_shock/article_em.htm

Electric shock can result in a minor or severe injury to a person. Symptoms of electric shock include burns, chest pain, shortness of breath. ... Take the Trauma and First Aid Quiz. Surprising Migraine Triggers Slideshow. ... Symptoms of an Electrical Injury. Electrical shock or injury can feel like a slight sensation, or it may lead to ...

www.cprcertified.com/blog/first-aid-basics-first-aid-for...

First Aid Basics: First Aid for Electric Shock. At nearly every turn, people living in a modern society are surrounded by electricity and electrical devices. When people come into unprotected contact with electricity, it can send a jolt or current of electricity shooting through the body.

www.sja.org.uk/sja/first-aid-advice/skin/electrocution.aspx

Get first aid tips and information from St John Ambulance about skin conditions such as burns and blisters. Find out about various symptoms and treatments. ... Electric shock can also be caused by handling an electric appliance with wet hands as water is a very effective conductor of electricity.

www.firstaidweb.com/electrocution.html

electrocution Electricity travels through conductors - any material which allows electrical flow - as it tries to reach the ground. Because people make excellent conductors, minor electrocution is a common household hazard.

en.wikibooks.org/wiki/First_Aid/Electrocution

First Aid/Electrocution. From Wikibooks, open books for an open world < First Aid. ... Electrical burns look like third-degree burns, but are not surrounded by first- and second-degree burns. They always come in pairs: an entry wound (smaller) and exit wound (larger). You should cover the wounds with nonstick, sterile dressings.